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LESOTHO – ongoing outreach work

Lesotho terrain is rocky, and often horses and donkeys get small stones lodged in the foot, resulting in abscesses.  This donkey was treated, bandaged, and booked off work until the foot has completely healed.  The owner will continue with treatment.
Lesotho terrain is rocky, and often horses and donkeys get small stones lodged in the foot, resulting in abscesses. This donkey was treated, bandaged, and booked off work until the foot has completely healed. The owner will continue with treatment.

We have made many visits to the small mountainous kingdom of Lesotho in the last year – we try to visit every six weeks. The people of Lesotho are overwhelmingly grateful for our assistance, and welcome our staff at each clinic. We have made a difference.

Over the last two years, we have refined our outreach work to formally encompass the education of owners and drivers/handlers, as well as giving the necessary medical attention required by the thousands of working equine that we help. It is the only way that we can sustain equine welfare.

It is difficult to believe that in some areas of our world, horse owners have never heard of deworming, vaccination, selective breeding….. all of the knowledge that we take for granted. But it is a fact. We have had feedback from owners who have been astounded at the improvement in the condition of their horses and donkeys after they have been dewormed… and a visit by our dentist reduces most rural owners to open-mouthed astonishment! Sadly, many of the community do not have access to dental services for their families.

We love working in Lesotho.

Our staff are trained in the basics of farriery.  They in turn pass on their knowledge to owners and handlers - we have seen a great improvement in the condition of horse's feet in Lesotho.
Our staff are trained in the basics of farriery. They in turn pass on their knowledge to owners and handlers – we have seen a great improvement in the condition of horse’s feet in Lesotho.

We are yet to secure Minimum Standards for the Welfare of Equines with the Government to ensure the care of animals kept in government owned pounds, but we are in touch with role-players, and are hopeful that once the situation has settled after recent elections, we will be able to achieve this.

Here are some recent photographs of our work – if you look back on the pictures of when we first started working in Lesotho, you will see a huge improvement in condition of the equines. We have achieved a large part of our goal 🙂

 

we needed to explain to the owner that the home-made bit he was using was chafing the sides of the horse's mouth.  We replaced the home-made bit with a donated second-hand bit, and showed the owner how to fit the bit correctly.
we needed to explain to the owner that the home-made bit he was using was chafing the sides of the horse’s mouth. We replaced the home-made bit with a donated second-hand bit, and showed the owner how to fit the bit correctly.

 

these donkeys arrive for their regular HHCU check-up in a Lesotho village
these donkeys arrive for their regular HHCU check-up in a Lesotho village

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Caring for equines is a costly operation, as any horse owner knows! It costs us over a thousand ZA Rand a month to keep one horse at the Unit. It is not possible for us to keep horses on a permanent basis - we would love to be a retirement center - but we have to spend our precious funds where they are needed most, and that is to bring in needy cases, rehabilitate, and re- home!
We cannot do this without your donations.

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